World Affairs

Inflation in the U.S. has reached its highest point since 1981. In developing nations, the problem is even worse. The UN says thirty-seven nations are in need of food, but can't afford it, triggering fears of food riots. So what makes prices for necessary things – like food and fuel – so volatile? 

 

This week, we revisit a conversation with filmmaker Rupert Russell about his book and film, “Price Wars: How the Commodities Markets Made Our Chaotic World.” Russell connects the dots between the cost of bread and oil to political upheaval around the world, and he explains why price swings by market players cause famine, conflict and crisis. 

 

Guests:  

 

Rupert Russell, author and director of Price Wars: How The Commodities Markets Made Our Chaotic World

 

Hosts: 

 

Ray Suarez

 

 

If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

Direct download: 6-27_World_Affairs_for_podcast_feed.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 2:00am PDT

Diversity has often been seen as the United States’ defining strength, but today some Americans see it as a threat. And this isn’t new. Throughout history, differences of religion, ethnicity, and origin have driven states around the world to war, violence, and extreme division. However, German-American political scientist Yascha Mounk says this isn’t the only path. 


On this week’s episode, Mounk joins Ray to discuss his new book, “The Great Experiment: Why Diverse Democracies Fall Apart And How They Can Endure,” which challenges the assumptions of a modern pluralist society and imagines how diverse democracies might succeed in an increasingly polarized political landscape.

 

Guest:

 

Yascha Mounk, associate professor at Johns Hopkins University, contributing editor at The Atlantic and author of The Great Experiment: Why Diverse Democracies Fall Apart and How They Can Endure

 

Host:

 

Ray Suarez

Direct download: 6-20_World_Affairs.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 2:00am PDT

In the second part of his interview with Ray, author Wajahat Ali discusses how the war on terror shaped attitudes towards Muslims in the United States, and how the Muslim-American political identity evolved in its aftermath. And despite his family’s American Dream being destroyed by US law enforcement, Ali manages to find optimism in a story of our country that is still being written.

 

Guest:  

 

Wajahat Ali, author of Go Back to Where You Came From: And Other Helpful Recommendations on How to Become American 

 

Host: 

 

Ray Suarez, host of World Affairs

 

Direct download: Waj_Program_pt2_for_podcast_feed.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 2:00am PDT

Even though writer and humorist Wajahat Ali was born and raised in Northern California to Pakistani parents, he gets told every day to "go back to where you came from.” Today, more than half of US citizens under 18 can trace their ancestry to Africa, Asia, and Latin America, yet many feel unwelcome in their own country. “The tragic history of America is that the rest of us have fought for a country and love a country when it doesn’t love us back,” Wajahat told Ray Suarez in a recent interview about his new memoir, Go Back to Where You Came From: And Other Helpful Recommendations on How to Become American. Wajahat takes readers on a journey to his childhood, figuring out the lines and boundaries of race and ethnicity on the fly, to an adulthood punctuated by the September 11 terrorist attacks, and an era of rising anxiety and suspicion of brown people of various origins in the years after. Through his personal stories, Ali manages to tackle the dangers of Islamophobia and white supremacy, with humor and insights into national security, immigration, and pop culture. 

Guest:  Wajahat Ali, author of Go Back to Where You Came From: And Other Helpful Recommendations on How to Become American 

Host: Ray Suarez, host of World Affairs

If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

Direct download: Waj_pt._1_for_podcast_feed.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 2:00am PDT

From mass shootings in the United States to Vladimir Putin’s brazen invasion of Ukraine, it can feel like the world is in a constant state of turmoil. Homeland security expert Juliette Kayyem has a prescription for learning to live in an “Age of Disasters.” In her new book, The Devil Never Sleeps, she explains how an international “architecture of preparedness” can help communities anticipate, assess, and manage urgent crises like gun violence and climate change. She talks with Ray Suarez about what global communities–and their leaders–can do to prepare before disaster strikes close to home.

 

Guest:

 

Juliette Kayyem, faculty chair of the Homeland Security Project and the Security and Global Health Project at Harvard University and author of The Devil Never Sleeps, Learning to Live in An Age of Disasters.

 

Host: 

 

Ray Suarez

 

Additional Reading: 

 

The Problem With 'Lone Wolf' Shooters

Design Your Organization to Withstand Future Disasters

How Leaders Prepare to Communicate in a Crisis

Direct download: Juliette_Kayyem_Segment_for_podcast_feed.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:00am PDT

Ray Suarez sits down with Ivo Daalder, President of the Chicago Institute on Global Affairs and former US Ambassador to NATO, to discuss the alliance’s evolution, the Russian “wake-up call” that placed it back in the news, and the future–and feasibility–of trans-atlantic defense.

 

To hear more from Ambassador Daalder, check out his weekly World Review podcast.

 

Guests:  

 

Ivo Daalder, President of the Chicago Institute of Global Affairs

 

Host: 

 

Ray Suarez

Direct download: Ivo_Daalder_Segment_for_podcast_feed.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 2:00am PDT

Apart from a distinct history and culture, Canadians have a vastly different political, legal and medical system from the United States. Yet there are times when the politics of the two North American neighbors move in rhythm. On today’s episode, Ray Suarez talks to Kelly Gordon, assistant professor of political science at McGill University in Montreal, about the nuances of abortion access and abortion politics across our northern border.  

Guests:  

 

Kelly Gordon, assistant professor at McGill University

 

Host:

 

Ray Suarez

Direct download: Kelly_Gordon_Segment_Final_REV1_for_podcast_feed.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 2:00am PDT

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