WorldAffairs

The Middle East has been a key focus of American foreign policy for the last three decades, and the events of 2017 ensure it will remain an area of focus. Between volatile proxy wars in Yemen and Syria, a declaration to move the US Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem and new protests in Iran, entrenched conflicts transformed and created new flashpoints over the course of the year. As the lead negotiator for peace processes in the Middle East under Presidents George H. W. Bush and Bill Clinton, Ambassador Dennis Ross skillfully brokered agreements between Israel and Palestine, digging into the messiest relationships in the region. How do the conflicts in the Middle East today compare to the situation under other administrations? What is the next stop on the long road to peace? Join us as Ambassador Ross shares his extensive diplomatic experience and discusses the Trump administration’s foreign policy in the Middle East.

SPEAKER:
Dennis Ross
Davidson Distinguished Fellow, Washington Institute for Near East Policy

MODERATOR:
Jane Wales
CEO, World Affairs and Global Philanthropy Forum; Vice President, The Aspen Institute

For more information please visit: http://worldaffairs.org/event-calendar/event/1800

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Direct download: 02_26_18_Dennis_Ross.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 10:59am PDT

The immigration debate has roared to the front of Washington, D.C.’s and the country’s agenda. At stake is the fate of DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, scheduled to expire on March 5th. That issue has been tied to increased border security, a possible wall on our southern border, the family reunification policy and a lower cap on refugee resettlement. As DACA hangs in the balance, what is the future for comprehensive immigration reform? Ali Noorani, Executive Director of the National Immigration Forum, is in conversation with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for the PBS Newshour.

This is Ray Suarez's maiden interview with World Affairs.

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Direct download: 02_19_18_Noorani_Suarez-Immigration.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:51am PDT

Capital has changed and capitalism is changing as a result. For the first time in history, businesses are investing more in things you can neither see nor touch – so-called intangible capital – than in traditional physical assets like buildings, machines, computers or vehicles. Intangible capital, such as R&D, design, software, brands and organisational capabilities, have different economic properties from traditional assets. As a result, the rise of the intangible economy is changing the economy and society in important and non-obvious ways. This new intangible economy helps explain a range of big puzzles and problems: why productivity is stagnating, why inequality is rising, why populism is on the rise. It also helps managers, investors and policymakers understand what to do about it.

Jonathan Haskel, economics professor at Imperial College Business School, and Stian Westlake, policy adviser to the Minister of State in the Department of Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy at the University of Cambridge, have written a new book, "Capitalism without Capital." They will discuss this new economic trend and what it means for the future.

SPEAKERS

Jonathan Haskel
Professor of Economics, Imperial College Business School, Imperial College London

Stian Westlake
Policy Adviser to the Minister of State, Department for Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy, Center for Science and Policy, University of Cambridge

MODERATOR:

Jane Wales
CEO, World Affairs and Global Philanthropy Forum; Vice President, The Aspen Institute

Direct download: 02_12_18_Intangible_Economy.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 11:29am PDT

In a symbolic breakthrough, North and South Korean teams will march together under a single unified flag during opening ceremonies at the Winter Olympic Games. Does this rare show of unity signify a substantial thaw in diplomatic relations on the Korean Peninsula? How might this impact growing international tensions related to North Korea’s nuclear weapons program? Gi-Wook Shin, Director of the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, and Kathleen Stephens, Former US Ambassador to South Korea, discuss the precarious relationship between the two Koreas. In the second part of this episode, World Affairs' CEO Jane Wales talks with David Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent for The New York Times, about how the US might turn to cyberwarfare to contain the threat of a nuclear North Korea.

 

SPEAKERS

Gi-Wook Shin
Director of the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center

Kathleen Stephens
Former US Ambassador to South Korea

MODERATOR:

Jane Wales
CEO, World Affairs and Global Philanthropy Forum; Vice President, The Aspen Institute

For more information about this event please visit: http://worldaffairs.org/media-library/event/1795

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Direct download: 02_05_18_Shin_Stevens_Sanger.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:44am PDT

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