WorldAffairs
Over the past few months, we’ve had to reimagine everything we do. From shopping, to eating and socializing, the ways we spend money have completely changed. And as each country manages the pandemic differently, the already fragile global economy has been disrupted by broken supply chains and shifts in demand. Now we’re questioning the role of the government, the future of capitalism and changing our values. The choices we make now could change the world for decades. On this week’s episode, we tackle these big issues and examine our new digital economy with James Manyika, Chairman and Director of the McKinsey Global Institute, Mohamed El-Erian, Chief Economic Advisor at Allianz, and Gillian Tett, Editor at Large at the Financial Times.
 
 
James Manyika, Senior Partner, McKinsey & Company; Chairman and Director, McKinsey Global Institute
 
Mohamed El-Erian, Chief Economic Advisor, Allianz
 
Gillian Tett, Chair of Editorial Board and Editor-at-Large, US, Financial Times
 

If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

Direct download: 07_06_20_Global_Economy_COVID-19.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 2:00am PDT

Seventy-five years ago, delegates from 50 countries met in San Francisco to sign the UN Charter. Initially, the purpose of the United Nations was to maintain peace and security through international cooperation and to essentially prevent another world war.  Today’s UN has 193 member countries and is facing a time of uncertainty and open disdain from US President Donald Trump, who has cut funding to the world body and declared, “The future does not belong to globalists. The future belongs to patriots.” On this week’s episode, we look at the UN’s achievements, its shortcomings and what the future holds for international cooperation with journalist James Traub. Then Ray Suarez talks with former Prime Minister of Canada The Rt. Hon Kim Campbell and former Foreign Minister of Mexico Jorge Castañeda about how the United States is viewed by its neighbors. 

 

Jorge Castañeda, former Foreign Minister of Mexico and author of America Through Foreign Eyes

The Hon Rt. Kim Campbell, Canada's 19th Prime Minister

James Traub,  fellow at New York University’s Center on International Cooperation, author of The Best Intentions: Kofi Annan and the UN in the Era of American World Power and regular contributor to Foreign Affairs and the New York Times Magazine


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Direct download: 06_29_20_UN_75.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 2:00am PDT

Some countries are using smartphones and facial recognition to track COVID-19 outbreaks, but here, in the US, we’re starting with simple phone calls. On this week’s episode, we take a closer look at contact tracing in California and what it might look like into the future. We also hear from San Francisco Bay Area activists about the risks of protesting during a pandemic and how to protect yourself and others.

Dr. George Rutherford, Director of Prevention & Public Health at University of California at San Francisco

Melissa Millsaps, Investigator at San Francisco City Attorney's Office

Jon Jocobo, Latino Task Force for COVID-19

Cat Brooks,  Justice Teams Network and co-founder of the Anti-Police Terror Project

If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

Direct download: 06_25_20_Contact_Tracing_Testing.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 2:00am PDT

Can we contain COVID-19 without a vaccine? Congress allocated $25 Billion for COVID-19 testing this year, but Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul M. Romer, says  that’s a fraction of what we need. On this week’s podcast, he and epidemiologist Dr. Jonathan Quick join co-host Ray Suarez to talk about what it would take to use testing and tracing to contain the virus safely reopen the US.

Paul M. Romer, Co-recipient of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Economics and Professor at New York University

Dr. Jonathan Quick, Managing Director, Pandemic Response at The Rockefeller Foundation and author of The End of Pandemics: The Looming Threat to Humanity and How to Stop It

If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

Direct download: 06_22_20_Romer_Quick_Testing.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 2:00am PDT

The outrage of the last two weeks has made it clear that we are at a moment of national reckoning. The Black Lives Matter movement is calling to abolish the police and redirect police funding toward education and public services. Ideas that once seemed radical are now being discussed by politicians both on the local and federal level. On this week’s episode, historian Nell Irvin Painter and anthropologist Christen Smith join Ray Suarez to talk about the global Black Lives Matter movement, policing in the Western Hemisphere and why it’s important to understand the role white supremacy has played in building our institutions. 

If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

Direct download: 06_15_20_White-Supremacy.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 2:00am PDT

Fiona Hill was President Trump’s top Russia advisor on the National Security Council and testified during his impeachment hearings that Russia systematically attacked America’s democratic institutions in 2016. On this episode of the podcast, Hill says Russia is poised to meddle in the 2020 election and she says that America’s divisive politics make us vulnerable to a “hacking of the minds.” 

In an expansive interview with Mina Kim, Hill talks about Vladimir Putin’s plans to hold onto power and how he stokes America’s political divisions to advance his causes.

If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

Direct download: 06_08_20_Fiona_Hill.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 8:00pm PDT

The United States presidential election is only months away and intelligence officials warn that the risk of Russian interference in our political system is high. On this week’s episode, Fiona Hill, who was a top Russia advisor under three presidents, talks with KQED’s Mina Kim about how Vladimir Putin uses our internal divisions to his advantage. And co-host Ray Suarez discusses Putin’s rise to power and the nationwide vote on a constitutional amendment that would allow him to rule Russia for another 16 years with Reuters correspondent Catherine Belton. They also discuss her new book, Putin's People: How the KGB Took Back Russia and Then Took On the West. 

If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

Direct download: 06_05_20_Russia-Putin.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 6:12pm PDT

"Don’t be evil." It’s an iconic phrase that was written into Google’s code of conduct during the early days of the company. It conveyed a utopian vision for technology that would make the world better, safer and more prosperous. But twenty years later, has big tech lived up to its founding principles or has it lost its soul? Rana Foroohar, Global Business Columnist at The Financial Times and Global Economic Analyst at CNN, documents the bigger implications for how tech companies now operate.  In her conversation with World Affairs CEO, Philip Yun, Foroohar looks at the extent to which the FAANGs (Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix and Google) threaten democracies, livelihoods and our thinking. 

If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please sign up for a World Affairs membership. Your donation enables us to produce programs you value and it connects high school students directly with leaders in the field of international relations while engaging them in critical global issues. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

Direct download: 06_01_20_Rana_Foroohar.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 12:11pm PDT

Harvard Business School professor Rebecca Henderson talks with Markos Kounalakis about how to reimagine capitalism in a way that aligns with our moral and ethical values. Henderson says it’s not only possible, but it’s profitable to move beyond an obsessive focus on shareholder value to solve global problems like income inequality, climate change, and the coronavirus pandemic. How can capitalism drive systemic change worldwide?

If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please sign up for a World Affairs membership. Your donation enables us to produce programs you value and it connects high school students directly with leaders in the field of international relations while engaging them in critical global issues. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

Direct download: 05_25_20_Reimagining_Capitalism.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 9:00pm PDT

What does it take to avoid the worst of the pandemic and allow a country to return to some sense of normalcy? Producer Teresa Cotsirilos and Radio New Zealand’s Indira Stewart explain how Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern managed to nearly eradicate the virus from New Zealand. And New York Times Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Nicholas Kristof has been sheltering in place in his home town of Yamhill, Oregon. Already devastated by the opioid epidemic, working class communities like Yamhill are reeling as the pandemic exacerbates America’s inequities. To learn more about Yamhill, check out Kristoff and co-author Sheryl WuDunn’s book Tightrope: Americans Reaching for Hope.

If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please sign up for a World Affairs membership. Your donation enables us to produce programs you value and it connects high school students directly with leaders in the field of international relations while engaging them in critical global issues. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

Direct download: 05_25_20_Leadership_New_Zealand_US.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 6:51pm PDT

When the novel coronavirus began to spread beyond China, we were told to stay home and flatten the curve. Many countries have been able to do that, to varying degrees, so what happens next? On this week’s episode, we’re taking a look at how governments around the world are struggling to re-open their economies. Timothy Martin, the Korea bureau chief at the Wall Street Journal, updates us on the latest outbreak in South Korea, a country being praised for how well it’s handled the pandemic. NPR reporters Joanna Kakissis and Rob Schmitz, explain how Germany and Greece may have avoided the worst of it, but are struggling to keep cases down during their reopenings. And former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, coronavirus advisor to former Vice President Joe Biden and  author of the new book, Fast Carbs, Slow Carbs, David Kessler, discusses lessons learned during the HIV/AIDS pandemic that could inform the search for  COVID-19 vaccines and drug treatments.
 
If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please sign up for a World Affairs membership. Your donation enables us to produce programs you value and it connects high school students directly with leaders in the field of international relations while engaging them in critical global issues. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.
Direct download: 05_18_20_Global_Reopening.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 8:58am PDT

At the age of 22, Amaryllis Fox was recruited to work for the CIA, making her one of the youngest female operators in the CIA’s history. After training, Fox was deployed to the Middle East where she infiltrated networks to disrupt acts of terrorism and stop illegal sales of arms and explosives. In her memoir, Life Undercover: Coming of Age in the CIA, she emphasizes that her biggest strength was her ability to connect with terrorists on a personal level rather than through tough negotiations. Out of government for over 10 years, she is now a peace activist and a mother. Fox sat down with KQED journalist Mina Kim to share her fascinating story of her time in the clandestine world of spycraft and how her perspective about her work at the CIA has evolved since she left.

 

If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please sign up for a World Affairs membership. Your donation enables us to produce programs you value and it connects high school students directly with leaders in the field of international relations while engaging them in critical global issues. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

Direct download: 05_11_20_Fox_CIA.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 3:00am PDT

As we’ve learned from this pandemic, human beings can act quickly in the face of immediate danger. However, we’re not so good at taking action against slow-moving threats. The threat posed by nuclear weapons is now as high as it’s been since the Cold War. This week on WorldAffairs, we talk about North Korea with veteran aid worker Katharina Zellweger, Pulitzer-nominated journalist Jean Lee and North Korean defector Joseph Kim. We also discuss Russia and nuclear proliferation with Dr. Ernest Moniz, who served as Secretary of Energy in the Obama Administration.

If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please sign up for a World Affairs membership. Your donation enables us to produce programs you value and it connects high school students directly with leaders in the field of international relations while engaging them in critical global issues. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

Host: Philip Yun

Producer: Teresa Cotsirilos

Senior producer: Jarrod Sport

Executive producer: Joanne Elgart Jennings

Direct download: 05_02_20_North_Korea-Russia_Nuclear_Threat.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 12:16pm PDT

While many of us are able to shelter in place through the pandemic, immigrants are disproportionately on the front lines, working essential jobs such as nurses, EMTs, home health aides and doctors. About 27,000 of these healthcare workers are adult children of undocumented immigrants that are authorized to work under an Obama-era program called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. Their future hangs in the balance as they await a US Supreme Court ruling on whether the Trump administration can legally end the program. And, for the many foreign born health workers, who have legal documentation, their ability to send remittances to families in their home countries has been compromised by the pandemic.

On this week’s episode, we hear from immigrant healthcare workers, journalists and representatives from non-profits who are fighting for workers’ rights. 

If you appreciate this program and want to support the work we do, please sign up for a World Affairs membership. Your donation enables us to serve the public and high school students and connect them to critical global issues – engaging and informing them along the way.

Direct download: 04_27_20_Undocumented_Essential.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 11:26am PDT

While many of us are able to shelter in place through the pandemic, immigrants are disproportionately on the front lines, working essential jobs such as nurses, EMTs, home health aides and doctors. For the many foreign born health workers, who have legal documentation, their ability to send remittances to families in their home countries has been compromised by the pandemic.

On this week’s episode, we hear from:

Rosalie Villanueva, nurse in Galveston, Texas

Jason DeParle, New York Times Global Poverty Reporter and Author of A Good Provider Is One Who Leaves: One Family and Migration in the 21st Century

Host: Ray Suarez

Producer: Teresa Cotsirilos

Senior producer: Jarrod Sport

Executive producer: Joanne Elgart Jennings

If you appreciate this program and want to support the work we do, please sign up for a World Affairs membership. Your donation enables us to serve the public and connect high school students  to critical global issues.

Direct download: 04_24_20_Rosalie_Journey.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:01pm PDT

How will we navigate a historic global recession? On this week’s episode, Financial Times US editor-at-large Gillian Tett talks with Markos Kounalakis about how this economic breakdown might unfold in the next few months. Next, New Yorker executive editor David Rohde talks about his new book IN DEEP, which investigates whether there really is a “deep state” controlling parts of the US government. He examines whether President Trump’s belief in the “Deep State” impeded the administration’s Coronavirus response. And last, filmmaker Jun Stinson and founder of Futbolistas 4 Life, Dania Cabello, join us to share their story of uplifting a community of undocumented youth in Oakland through soccer.

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Direct download: 04_20_20_Economic_Future_Deep_State.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:15pm PDT

Around the world, governments are limiting freedoms by requiring people to stay home and prohibiting large gatherings. Though many of these actions are necessary, authoritarian regimes are using the pandemic as an excuse to abuse their power. In Egypt, for example, many citizens are encouraged to shelter in place, yet the realities of the outbreak are being censored. Also of concern is an economy that’s largely dependent on the informal sector, making social distancing a luxury. Now that large gatherings are prohibited in most countries, causing huge economic losses, cultural practices are also being disrupted. Will sports games continue without audiences? This week on WorldAffairs, we talk about how journalism, sports and religion persist through a global crisis.

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Direct download: 04_10_20_Pandemic_Power.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 6:35pm PDT

Now that the global economy is mostly on hold, the demand for oil has dropped dramatically, destroying the market and threatening countries whose economies depend on selling it. Saudi Arabia and Russia have been engaged in an oil-price war to keep the markets in their favor. Saudi Arabia saw another economic loss when the kingdom decided to limit access to the holy cities of Mecca and Medina. Meanwhile, violence in some of the most at risk countries rages on. In Yemen, preventable diseases like cholera already threaten people with limited access to healthcare and basic necessities. Would a global ceasefire help war-torn countries like Yemen manage their coronavirus outbreaks? On this week’s episode, we talk with experts from around the world about Yemen, oil and Saudi Arabia.

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Direct download: 04_04_20_Saudi_Arabia-Oil.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 1:00am PDT

On this week’s episode, we check in with correspondents and artists from around the world. Dr. Erica Ollmann Saphire was instrumental in organizing a global effort to defeat Ebola. Can her team do it again for COVID-19? Co-host Ray Suarez also talks with journalists in Italy and South Africa, who are watching their countries’ responses to the pandemic closely. And though it feels like the rest of the world has come to a complete stop, artists have found creative ways to collaborate and keep us entertained. Members of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra created a virtual performance of Aaron Copland’s Appalachian Spring, which was commissioned in 1942 in a world at war. And lastly, photojournalist Caroline Gutman talks about her new exhibit, the Rhythm of Indigo, which documents indigenous Miao communities in China working to preserve centuries-old handicraft traditions at risk of disappearing.

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Direct download: 03_30_20_Global_COVID-19_Update_Art.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 9:20am PDT

On this bonus episode, we get behind the scenes of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra’s virtual performance of Aaron Copland’s Appalachian Spring. It was the brainchild of Principal Double Bass Jeffrey Beecher. 

Then we take you to the remote and mountainous villages of Guizhou Province, China, where indigenous Miao communities are working to preserve centuries-old handicraft traditions that are at risk of disappearing. Our guide is Caroline Gutman, photojournalist and co-founder of Nu Market.

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Direct download: 03_27_20_Virtual_Symphony-Rhythm_Indigo.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 6:53pm PDT

Breaking news about novel coronavirus is dominating headlines, making the context we need to understand it more important than ever. This week, as the virus redefines every aspect of our lives, we’re turning to the experts to help us understand where we were before the news of COVID-19 hit and how we ended up where we are today. What can we learn from past pandemics? How will this change our relationship with China, where this all began? First, we have Dr. Peter Piot, Director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine to discuss the Spanish flu, his experiences fighting the Ebola outbreak, including, what a resilient global health system looks like and what needs to happen to be prepared for a pandemic. Next, we hear from David M. Lampton, of the Stanford Spogli Freeman Institute, to discuss the complicated history behind the US - China relationship.

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Direct download: 03_20_20_Coronavirus_Warning_US_China.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 4:53pm PDT

Taiwan is just 81 miles from mainland China, but it has managed to prevent an outbreak of the rapidly spreading COVID-19 disease. Stanford University’s Dr. Jason Wang explains how Taiwan acted quickly, aggressively and strategically to prevent the type of outbreaks and death rates we’re now seeing around the world. We also hear from William Yang, Taipei correspondent for Deutsche-Welle.
 
Today’s unrelenting coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic can feel overwhelming. Though it may seem like the world around us has come to a stop, major global events march on. Stories about U.S. airstrikes against an Iran-backed militia in Iraq and Vladimir Putin’s new plan to become president for life may not be front page news today, but they will inevitably demand our attention soon. This week on the podcast, Deb Amos, international correspondent for NPR and Michele Kelemen, NPR’s diplomatic correspondent, talk with Ray Suarez about the world’s most important stories that you might have missed.
 
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Direct download: 03_16_20_COVID_19_Taiwan_World_News.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 2:06pm PDT

The World Health Organization is warning all countries to take the threat of a coronavirus global pandemic seriously as governments around the world are scrambling to effectively contain the spread of COVID-19. Local health officials worldwide are preparing for widespread outbreaks while encouraging citizens to remain calm. Financial markets are bracing for the worst as many schools and corporate offices are closing their doors. On this week’s episode, Ray Suarez talks with Larry Brilliant, a renowned epidemiologist, credited with playing a major role in eradicating smallpox, and Pulitzer Prize-winning global health journalist Laurie Garrett. We also get dispatches from Rafael Suarez in China, Christopher Livesay in Italy and Peter Kenyon, who recently returned from Iran.

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Direct download: 03_09_20_Coronavirus_Global-Pandemic.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 3:36pm PDT

How did El Salvador become one of the most violent countries on earth? And what role did the United States play in creating the notorious MS-13 gang? On this week’s episode, we explore the origins of El Salvador’s bloody gang war with journalist William Wheeler. Wheeler spoke with gang members, frustrated reformers, crime investigators and government officials to better understand the violence in the country and what is driving El Salvadorans northward and for his new book: “State of War: MS-13 and El Salvador’s World of Violence.” He is in conversation with World Affairs executive producer Joanne Elgart Jennings.

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Direct download: 03_02_20_MS-13_El_Salvador.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 1:00am PDT

The deadly civil war in Syria has raged for almost a decade. For besieged civilians, accessing basic services, like health care, comes with extraordinary risks. In his Academy Award® nominated documentary film, The Cave, director Feras Fayyad reveals a world of hope and safety inside a subterranean hospital. The hospital’s director is 29-year-old Dr. Amani Ballour. In a patriarchal society, she is a force and an inspiration as she keeps the hospital running through air bombardments, chronic food shortages and the threat of chemical attacks. Ray Suarez talks with Fayyad and Ballour about the National Geographic film and the current situation in Syria.

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Direct download: 02_24_20_Syria_The_Cave.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 1:00am PDT

US - India relations are back in the spotlight as President Trump travels to the world’s largest democracy. The visit comes as India faces the slowest economic growth since 2009 and social unrest against Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government, which has been pushing a Hindu nationalist agenda. Ray Suarez gets a debrief from Tanvi Madan, director of the India Project at The Brookings Institution and author of Fateful Triangle: How China Shaped U.S.-India Relations During the Cold War.

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Direct download: 02_22_20_India_Trump_Modi.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 1:00am PDT

Are we witnessing the end of Hong Kong as we know it - or is this the biggest challenge yet to China’s authoritarian rule? This week on the podcast, we’re looking at what’s driving the protests in Hong Kong and why the demonstrations have persisted for so long. We walk through the history of Hong Kong, right up to today with: Jeffrey Wasserstrom, professor of history at UC Irvine and author of Vigil: Hong Kong on the Brink, and former East Asia Correspondent for NPR and PRI’s The World, Mary Kay Magistad.

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Direct download: 02_17_20_Hong_Kong_Brink.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 1:00am PDT

American kids today are 55 percent more likely to die by the age of nineteen than children who grow up in other industrialized countries. Is the American dream an outdated one? Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn explore this question in their latest book, "Tightrope: Americans Reaching for Hope." It chronicles the lives of people Kristof grew up with in rural Oregon, where roughly a quarter of the children who rode the school bus with him, died in adulthood from drugs, alcohol, suicide or accidents. In conversation with KQED’s Mina Kim, Kristoff and WuDunn discuss why so many Americans are struggling with poverty, addiction and depression despite living in the wealthiest country in the world.

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Direct download: 02_10_20_Kristof_WuDunn.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 1:00am PDT

One question at the heart of the impeachment case against Donald Trump is whether the president threatened to withhold US military assistance from Ukraine. In this episode, we explore why the US has been supporting Ukraine in Europe’s only active war and why Ukraine needs help defending itself against Russian aggression. John E. Herbst, Atlantic Council and former US Ambassador to Ukraine, Oxana Shevel, Tufts University, and Simon Ostrovsky, Filmmaker and Journalist at the PBS NewsHour, speak with Ray Suarez.

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Direct download: 02_03_20_Ukraine-Explained.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 1:00am PDT

President Trump made building a border wall between the US and Mexico a cornerstone of his 2016 presidential campaign. Since taking office, he has called for a travel ban on people from Muslim countries.  He has limited the rights of asylum seekers and presided over a family separation crisis at the southern border. New York Times journalists Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Michael Shear discuss the decisions and the ideologies shaping US immigration policy with  WorldAffairs co-host Markos Kounalakis.

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Direct download: 01_27_20_Immigration.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 1:00am PDT

Protests from Paris to Santiago share themes of resentment towards economic policies that are seen as inherently unfair. These very public demonstrations show how, in many countries, citizens are losing faith in free market democracy, which emerged triumphant over communism and fascism in the 20th century. As the new world order is being reshaped, which form of government and governance will be ascendant? Stanford University’s Larry Diamond and Francis Fukuyama join WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez to discuss what’s at stake for liberal market democracy and the changing world order.

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Direct download: 01_20_19_Liberal_Capitalism.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 1:00am PDT

The killing of Iran’s most important general by an American drone and a subsequent Iranian missile attack on US assets inside Iraq, threatened to bring the United States and Iran closer to war than at any time since the hostage crisis in 1979. The U.S and Iran may have taken a step back from the brink, but underlying tensions between the two nations remain. In this episode, we look at the circumstances that led to this escalation. And we get an overview of how recent events impact the balance of power in the Persian Gulf. What are the strategic implications for Iran, the Middle East and the World? Vali Nasr of Johns Hopkins University, Barbara Slavin of the Future of Iran Initiative at the Atlantic Council and NPR’s Jane Arraf join WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez to talk about what US actions mean for the Middle East and the rest of the world.

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Direct download: 01_12_20_Iran_US.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 1:00am PDT

"Don’t be evil." It’s an iconic phrase that was written into Google’s code of conduct during the early days of the company. It conveyed a utopian vision for technology that would make the world better, safer and more prosperous. But twenty years later, has big tech lived up to its founding principles or has it lost its soul? Rana Foroohar, Global Business Columnist at The Financial Times and Global Economic Analyst at CNN, documents the bigger implications for how tech companies now operate.  In her conversation with World Affairs CEO, Philip Yun, Foroohar looks at the extent to which the FAANGs (Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix and Google) threaten democracies, livelihoods and our thinking.

We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW

Direct download: 01_06_20_Rana_Foroohar.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 1:00am PDT

After 21 years as CEO and host of WorldAffairs, Jane Wales has moved on to join the Aspen Institute. In this bonus episode, Jane says farewell and sits down with Philip Yun, WorldAffairs’ new CEO, for a brief conversation about his vision for the future of WorldAffairs. While working on North Korea policy under President Clinton, he learned that context matters.

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Direct download: Jane_Wales_Philip_Yun-BONUS.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 1:00am PDT

While globalization has lifted millions out of poverty, the geopolitical forces that drove it have largely left the middle class behind. There is a growing sense that the social contract established after WWII is broken. 

This is the third episode of our 3-part series on the rebuilding of that social contract from three distinct perspectives: that of the people, that of the corporate sector, and that of government.

Governments are accused of letting the social safety net disintegrate for the many while facilitating vast economic gains for the few. An ever-expanding wealth gap has reinforced these views. Jason Furman, economics professor at Harvard, and Gillian Tett, US managing editor for the Financial Times, discuss what role governments can play in forging solutions with WorldAffairs Co-host Ray Suarez.

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Direct download: 12_30_19_Social_Contract-Part_3.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 1:00am PDT

While globalization has lifted millions out of poverty, the geopolitical forces that drove it have largely left the middle class behind. There is a growing sense that the social contract established after WWII is broken. 

This is the second episode of our 3-part series on the rebuilding of that social contract from three distinct perspectives: that of the people, that of the corporate sector, and that of government. This first episode is from the people’s perspective. 

Since deregulation in the 1980’s, the only stakeholder that has mattered to business is the shareholder. Jay Coen Gilbert, co-founder of B-Lab, and Colin Mayer, professor at Oxford University and author of “Prosperity: Better Businesses Makes The Greater Good,” discuss why the corporate culture may be at an inflection point with WorldAffairs Co-host Ray Suarez.

We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW

Direct download: 12_23_19_Social_Contract-Part_2.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 1:00am PDT

While globalization has lifted millions out of poverty, the geopolitical forces that drove it have largely left the middle class behind. There is a growing sense that the social contract established after WWII is broken. 

This week and for the following 2 weeks, we’re featuring a 3-part series on the rebuilding of that social contract from three distinct perspectives: that of the people, that of the corporate sector, and that of government. This first episode is from the people’s perspective. 

What forces caused the social contract to break and more importantly, what can citizens do to rebuild it? Tom Nichols, professor at the Naval War College and author of The Death of Expertiseand Ian Bremmer, president and founder of Eurasia Group and GZERO Media, discuss why the people matter in rebuilding social trust with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez.

We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW

Direct download: 12_16_19_Social_Contract-Part_1.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

In May 2018, President Trump withdrew the United States from the Iran nuclear deal, and re-imposed crippling economic sanctions against Tehran. Iran responded by restarting elements of its nuclear program and sponsoring militant attacks against US interests and allies in the Middle East. Trump claims he will keep the pressure on until Iran agrees to a better nuclear deal, while Iranian leaders insist they will not negotiate under duress. Colin Kahl, Steven C. Házy senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies' Center for International Security and Cooperation and former national security advisor to the vice president of the United States, speaks with WorldAffairs CEO Jane Wales about Trump's Iran strategy and how it risks igniting war with the country.

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Direct download: 12_09_19_Colin_Kahl_Iran.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Globally, social media is playing an increasingly important role in politics. Not only does it determine our political discussions, it has transformed the way politicians communicate with both the public and each other. On this week’s episode, we’re discussing leadership and governance in 280 characters or less with Matthias Lüfkens, founder of Twiplomacy, and Charlie Warzel, op-ed journalist for The New York Times. They're in conversation with Markos Kounalakis, WorldAffairs co-host and visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution about the changed nature of political communication in the age of social media.

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Direct download: 12_02_19_Social_Governance.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Protesters have flooded downtown Hong Kong over the last six months, winning concessions and even adding to their demands. Experts say protests like these have proliferated around the world in recent years. But can they lead to lasting change? On this week’s episode of WorldAffairs, Richard Youngs, senior fellow at Carnegie Europe and and the author of “Civic Activism Unleashed: New Hope or False Dawn for Democracy?,” discusses what the explosion of civic activism says about the state of citizen discontent with Co-Host Ray Suarez.

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Direct download: 11_25_19_Power_Protest.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Africa is home to some of the fastest growing economies in the world. By 2050, it will have a population greater than China and up to a quarter of the world’s workforce. More than half of its population will be under 25 – presenting tremendous growth potential with the right opportunities in place and posing significant risks without them. Governments and businesses from all over the world are scrambling to have a strong footing in Africa by strengthening ties and making investments. In this week’s episode, we’ll consider what countries – from within and outside Africa – stand to gain the most and more critically, how Africans might actually benefit from this investment. Amaka Anku, head of the Africa practice at Eurasia Group, Alex Vines, head of the Africa Program and research director for Risk, Ethics, and Resilience at Chatham House, and Jonathan Ledgard, founder of Droneport and Linnaeus, make the case for the promise of Africa's future with WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez.

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Direct download: 11_18_19_Africa_Investment.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Susan Rice worked for the US State Department during some of the most challenging periods this country has ever faced, from Black Hawk Down in Somalia to the Iran Nuclear Deal. In her new book, “Tough Love, My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For,” she describes the family struggles, ancestral legacies, and personal experiences that led her to the White House and the United Nations. Susan Rice joins Jane Wales, Vice President at The Aspen Institute, to share her experiences, and offer her perspectives on today’s foreign policy challenges.

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Direct download: 11_11_19_Susan_Rice.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

The withdrawal of US troops from northern Syria has had grave repercussions for the security and stability of the entire region. The Turkish military has invaded northern Syria, killing dozens of Kurdish civilians and forcing over 200,000 Kurds to flee. In the absence of US troops, Russian and Syrian troops have rushed in to fill the power vacuum. Meanwhile, hundreds of ISIS fighters have escaped detention. Brett McGurk, distinguished lecturer at Stanford University and former special presidential envoy for the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS, and David Phillips, director of peace-building and rights at Columbia University and former senior advisor to the US Department of State, make sense of the cascading impacts with WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez.

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Direct download: 11_04_19_Syria_Crisis.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

At the age of 22, Amaryllis Fox became one of the CIA’s youngest female officers. After training, she was deployed as a spy, under non-official cover, working throughout the Middle East to stop acts of extreme terrorism and the illegal sale of arms and explosives. Fox joins KQED's Mina Kim to share her story of life undercover and talk about her new career working to promote peace around the world.

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Direct download: 10_28_19_CIA_Undercover.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Escalating tensions between the US and China, driven by an ongoing trade war, technological competition and unrest in Hong Kong, may have long-term consequences for both countries along with the entire global economy. David Lampton, fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute at Stanford University and director of China Studies at Johns Hopkins University, joins WorldAffairs co-host Markos Kounalakis to discuss how Beijing and Washington could diffuse the disruptive tensions of this growing rivalry.

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Direct download: 10_21_19_China_US.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Every minute, an estimated one million dollars of public money is funneled toward farm subsidies around the world. Critics say these payouts pervert the economies of supply and demand, hide the true cost of foods and harm the health of both us and the planet. Jeremy Oppenheim, founder and managing partner of SYSTEMIQ, and Dr. Ann Thrupp, director of the California Food Is Medicine Coalition and founder of Down-to-Earth Innovations, join WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez to discuss how subsidies impact food production around the world and how they might be redirected to sustainably feed a growing planet.

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Direct download: 10_14_19_Food_Subsidies.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

While the US has moved away from the term “colony,” the legacy of its colonial rule endures. In this week’s episode, we’re talking about America’s covert history of expansion and how that has impacted the people who live in those places. Daniel Immerwahr, professor of history at Northwestern University and author of the book, How to Hide an Empire, A History of the Greater United States, and Ed Morales, journalist and author of the new book, Fantasy Island: Colonialism, Exploitation, and the Betrayal of Puerto Rico, join WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez to discuss how Puerto Rico and other American territories navigate their complicated national identities.

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Direct download: 10_07_19_US_Colonialism.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

What started in June as protests against a controversial extradition law has grown into something much larger and more formidable. On this week’s episode of WorldAffairs, David Rennie, columnist for the Economist, Illaria Maria Sala, a freelance journalist based in Hong Kong, and a Chinese reporter who has asked to remain anonymous join WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez to discuss what the protests mean for Hong Kong, China, and the pro-democracy movement.

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Direct download: 09_30_19_Hong_Kong.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Democracy is in retreat worldwide. In his new book, "Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency," Larry Diamond argues that we are at a pivotal point where a new era of tyranny could upend the established order of liberal democracy. On this week’s episode, Diamond, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, joins WorldAffairs co-host Markos Kounalakis to discuss what it will take to save American democratic values abroad.

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Direct download: 09_23_19_Larry_Diamond.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 8:09am PDT

Guyana is the latest country where a major oil discovery has been made. With ExxonMobil set to begin oil production next year, the small, impoverished nation is on the path to become one of the richest in the world. But with oil production brings risk. Next door Venezuela offers a cautionary tale of the “resource curse,” a spiral of political corruption and economic mismanagement that has driven commodity-rich nations into crisis.  But it doesn’t have to happen that way.  In some places natural resource production has brought much-needed development through education, infrastructure and economic diversification. What can Guyana learn from countries that have avoided the resource curse?

Direct download: 09_16_19_Resource_Curse.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

A burning Amazon rainforest. Thinning ice sheets. Sea level rise. Wildfires in California. Thawing Arctic permafrost. It’s no surprise that many of us have anxiety about our planet’s future. The mental health impacts of climate change are increasing distress about the future while intensifying the trauma of natural disasters already happening. On this week’s episode of WorldAffairs, Caroline Hickman, Executive Committee member of the Climate Psychology Alliance and teaching fellow at the University of Bath joins WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez to discuss eco-anxiety in the age of climate change.

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Direct download: 09_09_19_Climate_Anxiety.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

By 2030, up to 800 million global workers may lose their jobs to automation. Technological advancement in an ever-globalized economy is changing both service-sector and professional jobs at a staggering pace. How can governments help workers remain vital to the global economy? Richard Baldwin, author of the new book, The Globotics Upheaval: Globalization, Robotics, and the Future of Work, is in conversation with WorldAffairs co-host Markos Kounalakis.

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Direct download: 09_02_19_Richard_Baldwin.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

While the Islamic State no longer has any territory in the Middle East, its ability to recruit soldiers and engage in violence remains. In fact, its newly decentralized nature may make it even more effective in carrying out terrorist attacks. On this week's episode, Ali Soufan, former FBI special agent and author of “The Anatomy of Terror: From the Death of Bin Laden to the Rise of the Islamic State,” and Robin Wright, contributing writer to The New Yorker and fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center, discuss the future of ISIS and the fate of tens of thousands of captured fighters and their families with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez.

We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW

Direct download: 08_27_19_ISIS.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Today’s elites are some of the more socially concerned individuals in history. But do their philanthropic missions really make a difference, or do they perpetuate the system of inequality they’ve profited from? Anand Giridharadas, author of the new book “Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World,” talks with Markos Kounalakis, visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution, about how philanthropists are preserving the very structures at the root of societal inequity.

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Direct download: 08_20_19_Anand_Giridharadas.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Recent tragic events in Gilroy, El Paso and Dayton have forced a painful reckoning amongst Americans across the country as kitchen table conversations turn to the issue of gun violence. While mass shootings have also happened in characteristically peaceful societies like Canada, Norway and New Zealand, those governments, unlike in the US, have been swift and decisive in enacting meaningful gun control. The question is: how do we do that here? New York Times columnist Max Fisher and Chelsea Parsons, vice president of gun violence prevention at the Center for American Progress, share their global perspectives on gun violence with Co-host Ray Suarez.

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Direct download: 08_12_19_Gun_Violence.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

In the modern age of Facebook, Google, and smart devices, most of us are under 24-hour surveillance. These data points are collected by large tech companies and are in turn sold to and used by governments and businesses alike to influence our behavior. On this week’s episode, Dr. Shoshana Zuboff discusses her new book, The Age of Surveillance Capitalism, which explores what can be done to protect democracy and free thought against these new threats. She is in conversation with Jim Fruchterman, founder and CEO of Tech Matters.

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Direct download: 08_05_19_Shoshana_Zuboff.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

In May 2018, President Trump withdrew the United States from the Iran nuclear deal, and re-imposed crippling economic sanctions against Tehran. Iran responded by restarting elements of its nuclear program and sponsoring militant attacks against US interests and allies in the Middle East. Trump claims he will keep the pressure on until Iran agrees to a better nuclear deal, while Iranian leaders insist they will not negotiate under duress. Colin Kahl, Steven C. Házy senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies' Center for International Security and Cooperation and former national security advisor to the vice president of the United States, speaks with WorldAffairs CEO Jane Wales about Trump's Iran strategy and how it risks igniting war with the country.

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Direct download: 07_29_19_Colin_Kahl_Iran.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

The most violent places today are not at war. Eighty-three percent of all violent deaths occur outside of conflict zones, and in 2015, more people died violently in Brazil than in Syria’s civil war. Yet multiple places which were once engulfed in violence and instability have recovered and have since formed stable democracies. Rachel Kleinfeld, senior fellow at Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and author of  "A Savage Order: How the World’s Deadliest Countries Can Forge a Path to Security", joins Markos Kounalakis, WorldAffairs co-host and visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution, in conversation about how violent and weak states transform into stable ones.

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Direct download: 07_22_19_Violent_Countries.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Facebook’s recent announcement that it would be launching Libra, its own blockchain cryptocurrency, in 2020 has provoked a message of caution from regulators and central bankers around the world. Many worry that the social media giant's 2-billion-strong user base could allow it to upend the current global banking system, a system that depends on trust and transparency. Not exactly characteristics that come to mind with Facebook’s recent history. Is the world ready for a widespread digital currency with no government to back it? On this week’s episode, New York Times reporter Nathaniel Popper and Angela Walch, professor of law at St. Mary’s School of Law, discuss the future of money with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez.

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Direct download: 07_15_19_Facebook_Libra.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Global warming is causing the Arctic Circle to heat up twice as fast as the rest of the planet. A melting Arctic opens up both new opportunities but also new risks. A power play between rival nations — China, Russia and the US — has emerged, putting security at the forefront of strategic goals. On this week’s episode, Sherri Goodman, a senior fellow at the Wilson Center’s Polar Initiative, and Malte Humpert, founder and senior fellow at the Arctic Institute, consider the geopolitical consequences of a rapidly melting Arctic with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez.

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Direct download: 07_08_19_Arctic_Race.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

What role has leadership played in history's greatest achievements? General Stanley McChrystal served in the US Army for 34 years, and rose in rank to become four-star general in command of all American and coalition forces in Afghanistan. He joins World Affairs CEO Jane Wales in conversation about effective leadership in a world of waning American influence abroad.

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Direct download: 07_01_19_Stanley_McChrystal.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Since becoming the supreme leader of North Korea in 2011, Kim Jong Un has solidified his power base at home, clearing out his father’s top advisors and expanding the nation’s nuclear program. While he’s often characterized by his odd behavior, he has successfully maintained domestic dictatorial rule while also exerting international pressure to establish state legitimacy. Anna Fifield, Beijing bureauchief for The Washington Post and author of “The Great Successor: The Divinely Perfect Destiny of Brilliant Comrade Jong Un”, talks with Markos Kounalakis, WorldAffairs co-host and visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution, about how a better understanding of North Korea’s leader might lead to improved relations with the closed-off nation.

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Direct download: 06_24_19_Anna_Fifield.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Protesters flooded downtown Hong Kong over the weekend, winning concessions and even adding to their demands. Experts say protests like these have proliferated around the world in recent years. But can they lead to lasting change? On this week’s episode of WorldAffairs, Richard Youngs, senior fellow at Carnegie Europe and and the author of “Civic Activism Unleashed: New Hope or False Dawn for Democracy?,” discusses what the explosion of civic activism says about the state of citizen discontent with Co-Host Ray Suarez. 

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Direct download: 06_17_19_Richard_Youngs.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

While the Islamic State no longer has any territory in the Middle East, its ability to recruit soldiers and engage in violence remains. In fact, its newly decentralized nature may make it even more effective in carrying out terrorist attacks. On this week's episode, Ali Soufan, former FBI special agent and author of “The Anatomy of Terror: From the Death of Bin Laden to the Rise of the Islamic State,” and Robin Wright, contributing writer to The New Yorker and fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center, discuss the future of ISIS and the fate of tens of thousands of captured fighters and their families with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez.

We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW

Direct download: 06_10_19_ISIS.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Rapid, sweeping changes in modern life are imposing new challenges upon society — but are also creating new opportunities. According to New York Times columnist Tom Friedman, these developments put a premium on “learning faster, and governing and operating smarter,” across the globe. He discusses the implications of this rapid transformational change for society with James Manyika, Chairman and Director of the McKinsey Global Institute.

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Direct download: 06_03_19_Tom_Friedman.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

What role can diplomacy play in an era of global authoritarianism, nationalism, and populism? Ambassador William Burns retired from the US Foreign Service in 2014, after a 33-year diplomatic career. He is only the second serving career diplomat in history to become Deputy Secretary of State. He joins World Affairs CEO Jane Wales in conversation about effective American leadership in a world of waning American influence abroad.

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Direct download: 05_27_19_Bill_Burns.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

While globalization has lifted millions out of poverty, the geopolitical forces that drove it have largely left the middle class behind. There is a growing sense that the social contract established after WWII is broken. 

This is the third episode of our 3-part series on the rebuilding of that social contract from three distinct perspectives: that of the people, that of the corporate sector, and that of government.

Governments are accused of letting the social safety net disintegrate for the many while facilitating vast economic gains for the few. An ever-expanding wealth gap has reinforced these views. Jason Furman, economics professor at Harvard, and Gillian Tett, US managing editor for the Financial Times, discuss what role governments can play in forging solutions with WorldAffairs Co-host Ray Suarez.

We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW

Direct download: 05_20_19_Social_Contract-Part_3.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

While globalization has lifted millions out of poverty, the geopolitical forces that drove it have largely left the middle class behind. There is a growing sense that the social contract established after WWII is broken. 

This is the second episode of our 3-part series on the rebuilding of that social contract from three distinct perspectives: that of the people, that of the corporate sector, and that of government. This first episode is from the people’s perspective. 

Since deregulation in the 1980’s, the only stakeholder that has mattered to business is the shareholder. Jay Coen Gilbert, co-founder of B-Lab, and Colin Mayer, professor at Oxford University and author of “Prosperity: Better Businesses Makes The Greater Good,” discuss why the corporate culture may be at an inflection point with WorldAffairs Co-host Ray Suarez.

We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW

Direct download: 05_13_19_Social_Contract-Part_2.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

While globalization has lifted millions out of poverty, the geopolitical forces that drove it have largely left the middle class behind. There is a growing sense that the social contract established after WWII is broken. 

This week and for the following 2 weeks, we’re featuring a 3-part series on the rebuilding of that social contract from three distinct perspectives: that of the people, that of the corporate sector, and that of government. This first episode is from the people’s perspective. 

What forces caused the social contract to break and more importantly, what can citizens do to rebuild it? Tom Nichols, professor at the Naval War College and author of The Death of Expertiseand Ian Bremmer, president and founder of Eurasia Group and GZERO Media, discuss why the people matter in rebuilding social trust with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez.

We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW

Direct download: 05_06_19_Social_Contract-Part_1.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

There is a wide consensus in liberal democracies around the world that the social contract is broken. How do we fix it? Beginning May 7th, this 3-part series explores the origins of the problem as well as solutions from the perspective of citizens, business and government.

Direct download: 05_06_19_Social_Contract-Series_tease.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 3:47pm PDT

Over the last decade, Russia has re-emerged as a powerful global player. In this week’s episode, we’re considering how President Vladimir Putin reinvigorated Russia's influence on the global stage and the potential impact of his future ambitions. Angela Stent,director of the center for Eurasian, Russian and East European studies at Georgetown University and author of the new book “Putin’s World: Russia Against the West and With the Rest,” discusses what Russian resurgence means for the world with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez.

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Direct download: 04_29_19_Angela_Stent.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

While the US foreign policy establishment is heavily influenced by views from the coastal middle class, the perspectives of the Midwestern middle class have largely gone unheard. Repairing that disconnect is at the heart of a new project aimed at starting a dialog that leads to better foreign policy, better engagement and better opportunity for those living in what has been derisively referred to as “flyover country.” Salman Ahmed, senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and Edward Hill, professor of public policy and public finance at Ohio State University, discuss how policymakers can make US foreign policy work better for Middle America’s middle class with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez.

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Direct download: 04_22_19_Ohio_Middle_America.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

At the southern border, the rhetoric and emotion surrounding the issue of immigration have stood in the way of comprehensive reform. Where policy has fallen short, international, national and local nonprofit organizations have stepped in to provide vital, life-saving services. On this week’s episode, we’re taking a sobering look at the realities of what happens to migrants when they reach the border. Joining us are civil society leaders working to lessen the trauma for migrants and asylum seekers fleeing violent crime and political persecution.

Lee Gelernt, Deputy Director of the ACLU’s Immigrants’ Rights Project, Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children, Maria Moreno, Principal of the Las Americas Newcomer School, and Jonathan Ryan, CEO and President of RAICES, are in conversation with Neal Keny-Guyer, CEO of MercyCorps.

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Direct download: 04_15_19_US_Immigration.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Globally, social media is playing an increasingly important role in politics. Not only does it determine our political discussions, it has transformed the way politicians communicate with both the public and each other. On this week’s episode, we’re discussing leadership and governance in 280 characters or less with Matthias Lüfkens, founder of Twiplomacy, and Charlie Warzel, op-ed journalist for The New York Times. They're in conversation with Markos Kounalakis, WorldAffairs co-host and visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution about the changed nature of political communication in the age of social media.

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Direct download: 04_08_19_Social_Governance.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

While some nations are willing to pay ransom to terrorists in order to free hostages, the US and Britain do not negotiate. As a result, a high number of American and British hostages have been killed. Should the US and Britain rethink their strategies? Joel Simon, author of the new book “We Want to Negotiate: The Secret World of Kidnapping, Hostages and Ransom,“ talks with Markos Kounalakis, WorldAffairs co-host and visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution, about the conflicts and consequences in negotiating with terrorists and paying ransom.

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Direct download: 04_01_19_Joel_Simon.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

In the modern age of Facebook, Google, and smart devices, most of us are under 24-hour surveillance. These data points are collected by large tech companies and are in turn sold to and used by governments and businesses alike to influence our behavior. On this week’s episode, Dr. Shoshana Zuboff discusses her new book, The Age of Surveillance Capitalism, which explores what can be done to protect democracy and free thought against these new threats. She is in conversation with Jim Fruchterman, founder and CEO of Tech Matters.

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Direct download: 03_25_19_Shoshana_Zuboff.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

While trade wars have been dominating headlines, globalization’s impact on labor has gone largely unnoticed. Global trade now favors more knowledge-intensive labor over low-cost, unskilled labor. How will this affect the future of work? Laura Tyson, distinguished professor and faculty director of the Institute for Business & Social Impact at the UC Berkeley Haas School of Business, and Susan Lund, partner and leader of the McKinsey Global Institute, discuss why globalized economies are in transition with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales.

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Direct download: 03_18_19_Globalization_Transition.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

In recent years, Hungary and Poland have become havens for alt-right movements that target human rights groups, feminists, and pro-immigration activists. But this rise of authoritarianism is not confined to Eastern Europe, and it has become a global phenomenon. In this week’s episode, we explore the forces fueling the erosion of democracies worldwide. Anna Grzymala-Busse, international studies professor at Stanford University andsenior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute, and Jason Wittenberg, political science professor at University of California, Berkeley, discuss the future of liberal democracies with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales.

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Direct download: 03_11_19_Eroding_Democracies.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

By 2030, up to 800 million global workers may lose their jobs to automation. Technological advancement in an ever-globalized economy is changing both service-sector and professional jobs at a staggering pace. How can governments help workers remain vital to the global economy? Richard Baldwin, author of the new book, The Globotics Upheaval: Globalization, Robotics, and the Future of Work, is in conversation with WorldAffairs co-host Markos Kounalakis.

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Direct download: 03_04_19_Richard_Baldwin.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Despite decades of autocratic rule, Saudi Arabia has historically been a close ally to the US. This has been especially true under the Trump administration, which saw the transition of power to Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman, also known as MBS. Initially lauded as a social reformer, MBS’ international standing has since fallen as a result of arbitrary arrests, the proxy-war in Yemen, and the murder of Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Steven Cook, senior fellow for Middle East and Africa studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, joins WorldAffairs Co-host Ray Suarez to discuss whether the US should reassess its ties to the Kingdom’s ruler.

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Direct download: 02_25_19_Steven_Cook_Saudi_Arabia.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

The three-month-old yellow vest movement in France is the largest protest the country has seen in decades. While protesters hail from diverse backgrounds, what they do share is a deep resentment towards both their government and their nation’s elites. And here the French are not alone. The Italian and British governments have also been feeling the backlash as yellow vest-inspired protests continue to spread. Does the yellow vest movement represent an inflection point for the future of Europe? Carnegie Europe’s Judy Dempsey and New York University’s Stephane Gerson share their insights with WorldAffairs Co-host Ray Suarez.

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Direct download: 02_18_19_Yellow_Vests_EU.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

On January 23rd, millions of Venezuelans took to the streets in support of Juan Guiado, the president of the National Assembly, as he swore himself in as interim president. While Guiado has the support of many foreign governments, including the United States, President Nicolas Maduro insists that he is the rightful leader. How did Venezuela get to its current economic and political crisis? What happens next? Venezuelan columnist Moisés Naím discusses the future of the country with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales.

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Direct download: 02_11_19_Moises_Naim.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

As democracy declines around the globe and geopolitical competition grows, US sentiment increasingly appears to favor going it alone. But if we abandoned our long-term global commitments, what would happen to the current world order? Robert Kagan, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and author, The Jungle Grows Back: America and Our Imperiled World, discusses the future of American foreign policy with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales.

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Direct download: 02_04_19_Robert_Kagan.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

In July 2014, Washington Post Tehran bureau Chief Jason Rezaian was arrested by Iranian police and accused of spying for America. What he initially thought was a political stunt became an eighteen-month prison stint with impossibly high diplomatic stakes. Jason Rezaian joins WorldAffairs Co-host Ray Suarez to share his story, as told in his compelling new book, Prisoner: My 544 Days in an Iranian Prison.

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Direct download: 01_28_19_Jason_Rezaian.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Artificial intelligence (AI) brings boundless possibilities. It can now drive our cars, diagnose our diseases, and even help us tackle climate change. But AI can also divide societies and drive nations to conflict. As we cede more of our fundamental decisions to machines, how do we ensure AI is designed with our best interests in mind? Fei-Fei Li, Co-director of the Stanford Human-Centered AI Institute and co-founder of the non-profit AI4ALL, and Olaf Groth, founder of Cambrian AI and co-author of the new book, Solomon’s Code: Humanity in a World of Thinking Machines, discuss how our relationship with AI is central to the future of humanity with WorldAffairs Co-host Ray Suarez.

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Direct download: 01_21_19_Groth_Li_AI.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

This program is a re-air from 2018.

In today’s reality, democracy no longer ends with a revolution or military coup, but with a gradual erosion of political norms. As a growing number of countries are chipping away at liberally democratic values, are these institutions safe from elected, authoritarian leaders? Daniel Ziblatt, professor at Harvard University and co-author of How Democracies Die, discusses the future of liberal democracies with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales.

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Direct download: 01_14_19_Daniel_Ziblatt.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

In the last fifty years, a doubling of the world’s population has contributed to substantial habitat loss and large-scale species extinction. What can we do, as individuals and societies, to fight back against environmental degradation and animal endangerment? In this week’s episode, Jonathan Foley, Senior Scholar at the California Academy of Sciences, and Peter Knights, Executive Director at WildAid, discuss how to curb climate change and the illegal wildlife trade with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales.

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Direct download: 01_07_19_Wild_Aid.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

This program is a re-air from earlier in 2018.

On December 12, British Prime Minister Theresa May faced a vote of no confidence in Parliament. May survived the test, but the lack of a Brexit deal still plagues her administration. The critical issue: how to avoid creating a hard border between The Republic of Ireland, remaining in the EU, and North Ireland, part of the UK. In this week’s episode, Fintan O’Toole, journalist for the Irish Times, talks about the high-stakes issues involved and shares his thoughts on a possible way forward with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales.

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Direct download: 12_31_18_Fintan_OToole.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

This extended program is a re-air from earlier in 2018.

The conflict in Afghanistan reached its 17th anniversary in October, and US involvement in Iraq will be 15 years. Americans are aware of these wars, but what about the almost 200,000 other US military personnel stationed around the world in over 130 countries? Where are American forces and what explains the large military footprint? Admiral James Stavridis, former NATO Supreme Allied Commander and Dean of the Fletcher School at Tufts University, and Richard Fontaine, President of the Center for a New American Security, discuss the value of the American military abroad with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for PBS NewsHour.

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Direct download: 12_24_18_American_Troops_Abroad.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

According to Stephen Walt, Professor of International Affairs at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government, the past three decades of US foreign policy have led to unnecessary wars, tragic death and failed diplomacy. He shares his insights with Jane Wales, World Affairs CEO, about how to reorient US foreign policy and restore global trust. Next, WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez will turn to the recent election of Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil, the newest member of a growing club of right-wing, populist leaders around the world. He'll speak to Brazil experts Paolo Sotero and Peter Hakim about the future of the country and its foreign relations policy under the new president.

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Direct download: 12_17_18_Stephen_Walt-Brazil_Election.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

In international trade, many experts believe that China has not played by the rules. But tit-for-tat tariffs, while justified, harm American consumers and producers. Is the tension between the US and China simply about trade, or is it a battle for global economic supremacy? Yukon Huang is in conversation with WorldAffairs co-host Markos Kounalakis.

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Direct download: 12_10_18_Yukon_Huang.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Why do an estimated 90% of startups fail? And what separates those that get disrupted and disappear from the startups that become successful global enterprises? On this week’s episode, we’re unlocking the secrets to these questions with Reid Hoffman, co-founder of LinkedIn and Greylock Partner. He is in conversation with James Manyika, director of the McKinsey Global Institute.

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Direct download: 12_03_18_Reid_Hoffman.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:29am PDT

The overuse of legal painkillers and the rise of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid which is easy to produce and transport across borders, has created a global opioid crisis. What do governments need to do to curb supply and combat addiction? Keith Humphreys, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University, and German Lopez, senior correspondent at VOX, discuss the consequences of a global drug market flooded by opioids with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez.

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Direct download: 11_26_18_Opioids.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Cyberattacks against governments and private companies have skyrocketed in both volume and impact. From election interference to the Sony studio hacking, cyberattacks can now be "blended" to inflict even more widespread damage, including inspiring acts of terrorism. In this week’s episode we’ll discuss the new types of cyber threats and the ways in which governments and corporate leaders are responding. John Carlin, former assistant attorney general for the US Department of Justice’s National Security Division, talks about the high-stakes risks with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales.

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Direct download: 11_19_18_John_Carlin.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

As the US midterm elections play out in early November, politics are everywhere, but national security policy should be distinguishable from politics, according to Dr. Susan Rice, the National Security Advisor to President Obama and US Ambassador to the United Nations. It is well documented that Americans are ever more divided: along party, ideological, socio-economic and cultural lines; by geographic, demographic, racial and religious differences. Indeed, Rice suggests that the most significant, long-term threat to our security may be our domestic political polarization. How can our national security interests be separated from the politics of the day? What are the most important national security policy objectives today and how can they be achieved? Ambassador Rice is in conversation with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales.

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Direct download: 11_12_18_Susan_Rice.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 12:33pm PDT

In today’s reality, democracy no longer ends with a revolution or military coup, but with a gradual erosion of political norms. As a growing number of countries are chipping away at liberally democratic values, are these institutions safe from elected, authoritarian leaders? Daniel Ziblatt, professor at Harvard University and co-author of How Democracies Die, discusses the future of liberal democracies with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales.

We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW

 

Direct download: 11_05_18_Daniel_Ziblatt.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Today’s elites are some of the more socially concerned individuals in history. But do their philanthropic missions really make a difference, or do they perpetuate the system of inequality they’ve profited from? Anand Giridharadas, author of the new book “Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World,” talks with Markos Kounalakis, visiting fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution, about how philanthropists are preserving the very structures at the root of societal inequity.

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Direct download: 10_29_18_Anand_Giridharadas.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Chief among the trends threatening global peace and stability is the weakening of the US leadership role around the world. As the US withdraws from international accords and President Trump criticizes allies, the rest of the world is left to pick up the pieces. In this week’s episode, Nicholas Burns, former US ambassador and professor at Harvard Kennedy School, discusses how traditional American diplomacy can help ease today's global tensions. He is in conversation with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales.

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Direct download: 10_22_18_Nicholas_Burns.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Over the past weeks, British Prime Minister Theresa May and EU leaders have been embroiled in a detail of the Brexit negotiations that was all but ignored since the referendum first passed. The critical question: how to avoid creating a hard border between Ireland, remaining in the EU, and North Ireland, part of the UK, the site of so much violence and upheaval a mere 20 years ago. In this week’s episode, Fintan O’Toole, journalist for the Irish Times, talks about the high-stakes issues involved and shares his thoughts on a possible way forward with World Affairs CEO Jane Wales.

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Direct download: 10_15_18_Fintan_OToole.mp3
Category:News & Politics -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

American exceptionalism has long been a tenet of US foreign policy. Today, it’s taken the form of an isolationist, “America first” approach. In this week’s episode, world renowned economist Jeffrey Sachs shares his perspectives on how a century of exceptionalism has created false justification for countless wars while leading to an increasingly polarized, unjust world. Sachs argues that in order to meet the global challenges we face, America must adopt an internationalist view, one that “embraces global cooperation, international law and aspirations for global prosperity.” He discusses his new book “A New Foreign Policy: Beyond American Exceptionalism” with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for PBS NewsHour.

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Direct download: 10_08_18_Jeff_Sachs.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

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